Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Theater of Gytheio

Although Gythio or Gytheio wasn't on my wish list, today it was nevertheless more than worthwhile the visit. Gythium was the seaport of ancient Sparta, some 40 kilometers (25 miles) north. The city used to be an important port until it was destroyed in 4th century AD, possibly by an earthquake.



Also in Roman times Gythium remained a major port and it prospered as a member of the Union. As purple dye was popular in Rome, Gythium exported that as well as porphyry and rose antique marble.


Evidence of the ancient Gythium prosperity can be found by the fact that the Romans built this small theatre against a hillside. Although only 8 rows in 4 cunei survived.

This is also where the thymelic performances used to take place. The thymelic was a song contest dedicated to god Dionisos, which included a parade and a sacrifice to the Roman emperors. Today, although the site is abandoned, there are some cultural events taking place in this theatre every summer, as part of the Festival of Gythio. They include ancient drama performances, public speeches and music concerts. (Source: www.greeka.com).

The theatre, as well as the city's Acropolis (west to the location of the theatre) was discovered by the archeologist Dimitris Skias in 1891.


The theater is located next to a Greek military base and is easily reachable. Curious (or bored) soldiers, stationed at the base will follow your moves while walking around at the premises making pictures. Not many people are attracted to this outskirt of the modern settlement.



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Theater of Gytheio

Although Gythio or Gytheio wasn't on my wish list, today it was nevertheless more than worthwhile the visit. Gythium was the seaport of ...